Review: Storm Front (Dresden Files #1) by Jim Butcher

Storm Front
Storm Front by Jim Butcher

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I was told the Dresden Files series was brilliant and many readers (and writers!) I admire have listed the series as a firm favourite. It was only when a lecturer of mine insisted I read it that I finally picked up the first book and gave it a go.

Now, it would probably be useful to explain away some of my initial hesitation here. For one thing, I usually get irritated by detective novels, especially with an arrogant protagonist (and boy, it takes some arrogance to beat Harry Dresden the wizard detective!). They simply grate on me. Another irk of mine is when a mystery story can only be resolved when the writer unveils some wild card the character has had/known about all along that the reader has been unaware of.
Unfortunately, both of these things feature very prominently in Storm Front, particularly in the first half. I understand that world-building requires the writer to reveal little bits at a time lest they overwhelm their readers with information but in this case this method was used to hide away the clues that mystery which is plain irritating and in my opinion, a lazy way of writing. It also made Harry Dresden’s pondering over the clues quite painful in retrospect because we’re made to believe he is smart yet him being unable to connect the information together earlier given his knowledge just completely shatters that character trait.
Don’t get me wrong, you can figure out a lot of the plot by yourself. In fact, the clues are all too easy to put together which makes Storm Front more of an action/adventure book than a detective book.

Of course, this wouldn’t be much of a problem if the characters were interesting enough but here lies my biggest problem in the book.
Harry Dresden tries far too hard to be funny and instead, it comes across as cringe-worthy. When you add to this some of his other strong personality traits – he’s misogynistic, he’s rude, he’s undecisive (not a bad trait in itself but in a fictional detective it’s an issue), Dresden is pretty hard to tolerate, let alone like.
You would think there would be more interesting characters to compensate for Dresden’s unlikeable personality but I was left disappointed here too. Many of the characters are quite flat and peppered with sweeping stereotypes.

Fortunately, a lot of these problems are made up for by the action scenes. These are usually full of suspense and accompanied by electrifying imagery that really save the entire book. This piqued my curiousity and ultimately spurred me on to continue with the series. After such a shaky start to the series, I don’t have high hopes for Fool Moon but with this series being the favourite of so many, I plan on reading until I figure out why!

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