Review: Fool Moon (Dresden Files #2) by Jim Butcher

Fool Moon
Fool Moon by Jim Butcher

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Brilliantly witty and entertaining, Fool Moon was an excellent step-up in the Dresden Files series from its anti-climactic first book, Storm Front.

The Dresden Files series was recommended to me by a history lecturer I have the utmost respect and admiration for so when I ploughed through the first book in the series, Storm Front, I was incredibly confused and disappointed. However, Fool Moon has managed to completely turn that around as the initially misogynistic, highly unlikeable, arrogant character that is the wizard Harry Dresden, has turned into quite a well-developed and sound guy. I’m not sure at what point this transformation happened but it made this book so much more enjoyable than its predecessor!
Another giant improvement in this book is its plot – it was sufficiently intriguing, action packed and mysterious for a detective novel and though it could be worked out quite quickly, the action alone was enough to keep the reader hanging on to see what would be around the corner. However, this was a double-edged sword as the intensely packed action scenes began to grow tiresome towards the end and it felt like the author was being stretched to fill a word count by adding more and more instead of leaving it well alone while the going was good.

As a standalone book, I probably wouldn’t have enjoyed the plot very much given how action-saturation it was but again, in view of the progress of the series, it was a refreshing break away from the lengthy description and background information doled out in Storm Front.

The characters in this are all much more developed (and realistic!) than they were in Storm Front, Butcher was careful this time around to add quirky little details which livened up the plot and gave the action scenes a nice emotional boost.
The world-building was also much better, in part because it actually told us information as and when Harry learned it himself rather than him dropping in the piece that solves the puzzle as a conveniently forgotten magical-world afterthought.

Something I enjoyed in Storm Front cropped up again in Fool Moon but this time, instead of turning the book around, it was incredibly frustrating. The action scenes already stretch the imagination to its limit by involving an array of creatures from the Nevernever (that’s the magical world) described with Harry Dresden’s colourful imagery but they begin to happen so often in this book that it’s difficult to pay attention to them or to keep up with Harry’s latest injuries. This gets to the point where the action scenes begin to lose all of their momentum because the amount of suspense building them up just can’t compensate for them getting devalued by sheer quantity. It was a real shame to see my favourite aspect from the last book being overused and ruining its impact in the follow on, I hope the balanced gets worked out as I read the third book in the series, Grave Peril.

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